Archives

  • 2018-07
  • 2018-10
  • 2018-11
  • 2019-04
  • 2019-05
  • 2019-06
  • 2019-07
  • 2019-08
  • 2019-09
  • 2019-10
  • 2019-11
  • 2019-12
  • 2020-01
  • 2020-02
  • 2020-03
  • 2020-04
  • 2020-05
  • 2020-06
  • 2020-07
  • 2020-08
  • 2020-09
  • 2020-10
  • 2020-11
  • 2020-12
  • 2021-01
  • 2021-02
  • 2021-03
  • 2021-04
  • 2021-05
  • 2021-06
  • 2021-07
  • 2021-08
  • 2021-09
  • 2021-10
  • 2021-11
  • 2021-12
  • 2022-01
  • 2022-02
  • 2022-03
  • 2022-04
  • 2022-05
  • 2022-06
  • 2022-07
  • 2022-08
  • 2022-09
  • 2022-10
  • 2022-11
  • 2022-12
  • 2023-01
  • 2023-02
  • 2023-03
  • 2023-04
  • 2023-05
  • 2023-06
  • 2023-07
  • 2023-08
  • 2023-09
  • 2023-10
  • 2023-11
  • 2023-12
  • 2024-01
  • 2024-02
  • 2024-03
  • 2024-04
  • 2024-05
  • 2024-06
  • br Acknowledgements br Data The front panel and

    2018-11-07


    Acknowledgements
    Data The front panel and block diagrams constituting the LabVIEW® Virtual Instrument (VI) are shown (Figs. 1–4) to demonstrate the software/programmatic component of the pHstat system. Figs. 1 and 2 depict the front panel of the two functionalities of the VI. The front panel is the portion of the VI with which the user interacts during an experiment or whenever the VI is running. The block diagrams contain the actual graphical code for running the LabVIEW® VI (Figs. 3 and 4). Figs. 3.1–3.4 and 4.1–4.3 show the graphical code blocks separated broadly by function. Details on connecting this code language to the electromechanical portion of the pHstat can be found in Golda et al. [2]. The figures are followed by operational instructions for using the VI as it operates according to the coding blocks presented in Figs. 3, 4, 3.1–3.4, and 4.1–4.3. Fig. S1 shows the detailed schematic of the electromechanical portion of the pHstat system, the conditioning electronically operated relay grouping (GEORG).
    Experimental design, materials and methods In brief, the pHstat includes all of the components necessary for high-resolution, in situ imatinib mesylate monitoring and autonomous pH adjustments. The pH of the culture vessel is continuously monitored by an in situ pH sensor (Vernier, Beaverton, OR) interfaced to a LabVIEW® Virtual Instrument (VI) via a series of electromechanical components. LabVIEW® is a graphical coding language [1] designed by National Instruments (Austin, TX). Our VI uses maximum and minimum pH thresholds determine when to add liquid reagents or gasses to the culture vessel in order to modify the pH. When the pH returns to the acceptable thresholds, the system deactivates and remains on standby until the next pH deviation occurs. A complete description of the system can be found in Golda et al. [2].
    Acknowledgements This work was supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (through a Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Graduate Fellowship to RLG) and Oregon Sea Grant (through a Robert E. Malouf Marine Studies Scholarship to RLG) and by NSF Cooperative agreement OCE-0424602 (the Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction to TDP and JAN). We would also like to acknowledge R.L. Johnson for his assistance in providing LabVIEW® training and troubleshooting advice.
    Data Table 1 in this data article contains data for independent variables and their coded levels to central composite design. Normal probability plot and residual versus fit plot for fluoride adsorption efficiency are depicted in Fig. 1. Central composite design 3-D surface plots which showing effect of various parameters on fluoride removal efficiency with the adsorbent are presented in Fig. 2. The data for model summary statistics and ANOVA for central composite design are listed in Tables 2 and 3. The FTIR spectra for fresh and used adsorbent in the F adsorption are also depicted in Fig. 3. The surface morphology (SEM) of the adsorbent was presented in Fig. 4. The XRD analysis was used to explore fresh and used adsorbent structure; the results of this analysis are shown in Fig. 5. The pHzpc factor which is important for explanation the pH effect on the removal of pollutant [1,2] is seen in Fig. 6. Table 4 shows isotherm models data used in this article.
    Experimental design, materials and methods
    Acknowledgements The authors are grateful to the Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran for the financial support (Grant no.: 1393-H-120) to conduct this work.
    Data Figs. 1–3 depict expression profile of top 100 genes that has at least one exon or intron differentially expressed in WT vs RDM16, WT vs STA1, and RDM16 vs STA1 respectively. The color key is given with Fig. 3. Fig. 4: Figure shows the alignment of MORC6 protein to the ATPase-C family members that have conserved three ATP binding sites at 8, 11 and 14th position of the alignment. There are few more ATP binding sites at 55–65, 104–107, 123–125, 166–169 but may not be contributing in the ATP binding since co-factor binding site is only available in the protein sequence that is coded by exon4 in MORC6 (region highlighted in yellow).